Japan’s original subscription box

Japan’s original subscription box

Japan’s original subscription box

Japan’s original subscription box

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History of Gachapon

Gacha Gacha Crate

 

Japan is home to a wide variety of intriguing, fantastic, and downright bizarre items. One uniquely Japanese product category ranges from cube-shaped dogs to miniature kitchen appliances, anime figures, and everything in between. Japan is a country where capsule toys are frequently seen. They may be found in Akihabara's eateries, retail centers, and Electric towns.

 

Japanese people enjoy the excitement of receiving something unexpectedly each time. Adults and tourists have recently become interested in these artistic collection toys. Japanese animation film lovers even collect gachapon toys or capsule toys of their favorite characters as gifts. Let's go deeper and learn more about this adorable magical capsule toy machine.

 

What is Gachapon?

 

 

The renowned "Gacha-Gacha" collectibles were inspired by a vending machine that dispensed capsule toys that could be retained as a decoration or a collectible souvenir. Capsule machines called gachapon or gashapon dispense trinkets, toys, figurines, and occasionally more useful objects for a few hundred yen. The collectible you get is usually chosen randomly from a set of multiple items that each machine typically has in stock. This implies that if you want the whole set, you will likely obtain some duplicates along the road.

 

Additionally, the term itself is an onomatopoeia, with "pon" denoting the capsule dropping into the dispenser and "gacha gacha" denoting the sound the machine produces as you turn the wheel. Although the term "gachapon" is technically the translation of the katakana, it is used slightly more frequently in English writing. Both have a very identical tone, making them interchangeable.

 

The History of Gachapon

 

 

Capsule machines called gachapon or gashapon dispense trinkets, toys, figurines, and occasionally more useful objects for a few hundred yen. The collectible you get is chosen randomly from a set of multiple items that each machine typically has in stock. This implies that if you want the whole set, you will likely obtain some duplicates along the road.

 

Additionally, the term itself is an onomatopoeia, with "pon" denoting the capsule dropping into the dispenser and "gacha gacha" denoting the sound the machine produces as you turn the wheel. Although the term "gachapon" is technically the translation of the katakana, it is used slightly more frequently in English writing.

 

Where to find Gachapon Machine?

 

 

Want to bring home a one-of-a-kind souvenir from your trip to Japan? These tiny toys could revive some childhood memories deeply ingrained in Japanese pop culture. Gacha-gacha is a popular game among foreigners, and many locations are now available for purchase. Gachapon is a recognizable capsule toy dispenser that can be seen on nearly every corner of the major streets in Japan.

 

There are dozens, if not hundreds, of these Gachapon machines virtually everywhere you look in some well-known areas of Japan, such as Harajuku. They may also be found in eateries, retail centers, and all over Akihabara. For access to more than 500 Gachapon machines, go to "Gachapon Kaikan" in Akihabara. Gachapon can also be found at game rooms and arcades, shopping malls, konbini stores, departure areas of airports, and main train stations around Japan.

 

How to use a Gachapon Machine?

 

Gachapon is quite easy to use. Don't be confused by the machine's Japanese text. Finding a machine with what you want is the first step. Next, locate the pricing on the machine's front left side. Others use red and blue numbers, while others simply state the price. You need as many 100 yen coins as shown by the first blue number and as many 10 yen coins as indicated by the second. The majority of gacha costs about 300 yen (USD 3.0).

 

Next, insert the right quantity of coins into the slot on the right-hand side. Once the "gacha gacha" noise ends, and you hear the "pon" of your prize falling, turn the machine's middle knob. To claim your prize, open the dispensing cover on the bottom left, reach inside, and hope you got the one you were looking for.

 

What is inside a Gachapon?

 

 

At the risk of sounding overly dramatic, practically anything can emerge from one of these devices. While many gachapon sell items you might expect, like tiny figurines, key chains, or phone straps, there is always one more machine that provides you with underpants or an odd towel to wrap around your household items.

 

Moreover, numerous machines produce miniature copies of commonplace items, including seats, carts, condiments, and street signs. Of course, some machines provide you the chance to experience the cutest things possible, such as your favorite sleeping animal or lovable creatures sweetly clinging to your glass with both hands. Here are more types of collectibles you can find in capsule toy vending machines.

 

1. Anime Characters

 

 

In these capsule toy machines, there are a variety of characters and different figures that can be found, and manga animated characters are one of the main reasons why people collect gachapon when they visit Japan. Well-known figures include Sailor Moon, Pokemon, Totoro, and many others. Gacha Gacha players love Disney characters as well. These characters, which include Mickey Mouse and Disney movie princesses, are being developed for various awards.

 

2. Animal Figures

 

 

Animal figures can also be obtained in Japan at capsule toy machines. Shiba Inu and cats are particularly adorable; people frequently collect them out of affection for these animals, in addition to the fact that they are just so adorable. You can use them to adorn your workspace at work or to add a sweet touch to your house.

 

3. Food

 

 

Another gachapon category that is particularly well-liked by tourists is fake food. This could be one of the humorous and inventive ways that Japan makes a living more joyful. Even smaller food models affixed to keychains are available at gachapon toy machines. There are little keychain versions of ketchup, Karashi, and even Japanese omelets because their adorable miniature size makes them impossible to refuse. The dish looks so delicious that you would even want to taste it.

 

Although gachapon was initially designed to appeal to youngsters, the brands have gradually won over the adult market by broadening their offerings and models, occasionally creating partnerships with confectionary firms or clothes retailers. Each month, 150 new toys and different brand items are released. The tiny plastic ball indeed houses a toy and a tiny compartment for Japanese culture. The richness of Japanese culture is demonstrated by the rows of Gachapon machines arranged along the streets. Try it the next time you pass a Gachapon machine and use the tiny capsule toy in your palm with Japan Crate.

 

It's Japan Crate Time!

 

Japan Crate offers a gachapon subscription box, Gacha Gacha Crate, which features a colorful assortment of 8–10 gachapon capsules, figurines, toys, collectibles, & more—direct from the Japanese gachapon machines. With every monthly package, Gacha Gacha provides you with the greatest excitement and suspense, staying faithful to the gachapon ideal. For more entertainment, mystery, and Gacha Gacha craziness, subscribe right now.


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